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They came, they saw, they served

St. Luke's Mission of Mercy had a lot to be thankful for this past weekend as young volunteers helped to fill bags with Thanksgiving Day goodies for the clients the Buffalo mission serves.

Statement from U.S. Bishops’ Chairman of International Justice and Peace Committee on Nuclear Weapons

WASHINGTON—Bishop David J. Malloy of Rockford and Chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on International Justice and Peace, issued the following statement:

“‘Protect All Life’ was the poignant theme of Pope Francis’ Apostolic Journey to Japan this past weekend. In Nagasaki and Hiroshima, the Holy Father gave a powerful witness to the grave threat poised to human life by nuclear weapons. Following in the footsteps of Saint John Paul II, and reiterating the teaching of his predecessors, Pope Francis called for a world without nuclear weapons.

“For our part, the Catholic bishops of the United States remain firmly committed to global nuclear disarmament. We declared in 1993: ‘The eventual elimination of nuclear weapons is more than a moral ideal; it should be a policy goal.’”

“The United States and Russia have over 90% of the world’s nuclear weapons. This fact alone calls for our nation to exercise global leadership for mutual, verifiable nuclear disarmament. The extension of New START Treaty with Russia would be a prudent next step.”

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Keywords: U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB, Pope Francis, Bishop David J. Malloy, Committee on International Justice and Peace, nuclear disarmament, Japan, Hiroshima, Nagasaki.

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Media Contacts:
Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte
202-541-3200

 

Bishop of Rockford Appointed as Chairman of U.S. Bishops’ Committee on International Justice and Peace

WASHINGTON—Bishop David J. Malloy of Rockford has been appointed as Chairman of the U.S. Bishops’ Committee on International Justice and Peace by Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles, President of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

The chairmanship of the Committee had previously been held by Archbishop Timothy P. Broglio of the Military Services, USA, who was elected as Conference secretary last week during the bishops’ November General Meeting in Baltimore, creating the vacancy. Bishop Malloy had been voted chairman-elect of the Committee on International Justice and Peace, thus will assume the chairmanship one year early.

In carrying out their work, the Committee advises and assists the bishops, both collectively and individually, in advancing the social mission of the Catholic Church on international justice and peace through policy development, advocacy, education, outreach, and acts of ecclesial solidarity. The work of the Committee includes international public policy issues, especially integral human development, human rights, religious freedom, and peace

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Keywords: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB, Archbishop José H. Gomez, Bishop David J. Malloy, Diocese of Rockford, Archbishop Timothy P. Broglio, Committee for International Justice and Peace.

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Media Contacts:
Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte
202-541-3200

 

 

Catholic Leaders Voice Concern Over New Asylum Rules

WASHINGTON - On Monday, November 18, the Administration published two notices in the Federal Register to implement asylum cooperative agreements with Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador. The rules would allow the U.S. government to send asylum seekers to the three Central American countries without the opportunity to access asylum in the United States, and require the respective Central American governments to adjudicate asylum claims and attempt to provide protection.

Bishop Mario E. Dorsonville, auxiliary bishop of Washington and Chairman of the Committee on Migration for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) and Sean Callahan, President and CEO of Catholic Relief Services (CRS), issued the following statement in response:
 
“Vulnerable individuals seeking protection and safety in the United States should be welcomed and given the chance to access the protection that our laws provide. If implemented, we fear that the asylum cooperation agreements would leave many helpless people, including families and children, unable to attain safety and freedom from violence and persecution. The governments of Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras do not have the resources nor the capacity to safely accept, process, and integrate asylees. There are numerous concerns with the implementation of these agreements which have also been voiced by the Catholic Church of Guatemala. Furthermore, these agreements do not address the root causes of forced migration and could further endanger the lives of people fleeing a region that continues to have some of the highest homicide rates in the world.

These rules, combined with the implementation of the Migration Protection Protocol and the continued hold of humanitarian and development assistance to Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras, undermines U.S. moral leadership in protecting vulnerable populations and risks further destabilizing the region. To preserve and uphold the sacredness and dignity of all human life, we cannot turn our back on families and individuals in desperate need of help. In light of the Gospel, let us always remember we are invited to embrace the foreigner and to take care of this human person. Let us move ourselves from a culture of indifference to a Christian culture of solidarity. We can and must do more.”
 
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Keywords: U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB, Bishop Mario Dorsonville, Archdiocese of Washington, Sean Callahan, Catholic Relief Services, CRS, Committee on Migration, asylum, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador.
 
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Media Contacts:
Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte
202-541-3200

 

Niagara Catholic High School Purchased

The sale of Niagara Catholic High School, which was on the market, was finalized today.

See you at the pole

At my small Catholic high school, I am grateful to have always had strong role models who were in the classes ahead of mine.

U.S. Bishops’ Pro-Life Chairman Joins Pro-Life Coalition in Asking President to Oppose Amendment Enriching Global Abortion Providers

WASHINGTON – On November 21, Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann of Kansas City and Chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee for Pro-Life Activities joined 17 other pro-life groups in urging President Trump to ensure that an amendment led by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), which would enrich global abortion providers, is not part of any final appropriations package.

In a letter to the president, the groups expressed “great concern” that the administration’s significant pro-life actions, “including [the] administration’s Protecting Life in Global Health Assistance policy (PLGHA), will be undermined by the Shaheen amendment which was included in the Senate’s State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs (SFOPS) appropriations bill.”  

The letter pointed to several problems, particularly that the amendment “increases a highly controversial earmark for international family planning by $57.55 million above current law, from $575 million to $632.55 million.” The groups noted that “more money for this earmark exploits an aspect of the PLGHA that allows this account to serve as a taxpayer-funded supplemental for U.S.-based NGOs that actively promote abortion overseas. In FY 2018, the U.S. provided nearly $280 million in foreign aid to groups involved in abortion activities overseas.”

The coalition strongly urged President Trump to communicate with the U.S. Congress that the amendment is a poison pill that violates the Budget Agreement and to oppose the inclusion of the amendment in any final appropriations package.

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Keywords: U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB, Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann, Archdiocese of Kansas City, Pro-Life Activities, Protecting Life in Global Health Assistance, PLGHA, President Trump, appropriations, SFOPS, Sen. Jeanne Shaheen

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Media Contacts:
Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte
202-541-3200

 

Respect Life! Challenge the culture of Death!

St. Pope John Paul II, in his powerful encyclical letter "Evangelium Vitae" ("The Gospel of Life"), challengingly said "How can we fail to consider the violence against life done to millions of human beings

New appointments in the diocese

Bishop Richard J. Malone has appointed Father Joseph Porpiglia as the new pastor of Blessed Sacrament Parish in Buffalo, effective Nov. 6, the assignment is for a term of six years. Ordained in 1986, Father Porpiglia has served as parochial vicar of St. Amelia Parish in Tonawanda, St. James Parish in Jamestown, St. Teresa Parish in Buffalo, and Nativity of Our Lord Parish in Orchard Park.  His first pastorate was at Holy Cross Parish, Salamanca. In 2007, he was appointed pastor of St. Benedict, Eggertsville. In 2013, he was named pastor of St. Mary Parish, Cattaraugus, and St. Joseph Parish, Gowanda. Father Porpiglia has also served as a Navy chaplain since 2001.

Father Peter Hai Nguyen, who was recently incardinated into the Diocese of Buffalo, has been appointed pastor of Coronation Parish in Buffalo, effective Oct. 9 for a term of six years.  Father Nguyen had been serving as administrator of Coronation since 2014.

Deacon Gregory Feary has been appointed temporary pastoral administrator of Our Lady Help of Christians Parish in Cheektowaga, effective Oct. 14.  He replaces Father Swiatek who had been serving as administrator, and who will continue to serve as sacramental minister.

Father Michael Uebler's term as pastor of St. Francis of Assisi in Tonawanda has been extended for a fourth term of six years to Sept. 19, 2025.

Father James Bastian has been appointed to a second term as pastor of Immaculate Conception Parish in Ransomville to Sept. 19, 2025.

Bishop Richard J. Malone announced Michael E. Attea as the new director of Catholic Cemeteries for the Diocese of Buffalo. Attea has served Catholic Cemeteries for over 12 years as a family service counselor and development manager.

As director, Attea will oversee the operation of seven locations of diocesan cemeteries across Western New York. His primary function is to assure they are fiscally self-sustaining and operated in accordance with civil and church laws and guidelines. The director is the chief executive, fiscal and operating officer with responsibility for the management and direction of all operations, programs, activities and affairs of the cemeteries.

"It's been a gratifying 12 years at Catholic Cemeteries. There's such satisfaction and fulfillment in helping people and families in their time of need," Attea said.

Before joining the Catholic Cemeteries team, Attea served as store manager with FWS for 17 years and as a sales consultant for Keyser Cadillac. Attea replaces Carmen Colao, who retired from the diocese after 40 years, 30 of which were as director of Catholic Cemeteries. Attea stepped into his new position on Sept. 27.

National Collection Provides Much-Needed Support Each Year for Retired and Elderly Religious

WASHINGTON—For over 30 years, the Retirement Fund for Religious collection has been coordinated by the National Religious Retirement Office (NRRO) to be held in U.S. Catholic dioceses at the discretion of the local bishop. This year, the annual appeal will be held the weekend of December 7-8.

Benefitting some 30,000 senior Catholic sisters, brothers, and religious order priests, the Catholic bishops of the United States launched the Retirement Fund for Religious in 1988 to help address the profound lack of retirement funding among U.S. religious communities. The proceeds are distributed to eligible religious order communities to assist with retirement and healthcare expenses, and roughly 94% of the fund goes to aid elderly religious.

Historically, Catholic sisters, brothers, and religious order priests—collectively known as women and men religious—engaged in ministry for little pay. Any surplus income was reinvested in their ministries, including Catholic schools and hospitals. As a result, today, hundreds of religious communities lack adequate retirement savings to care for the aging members of their communities. The demographics of most religious communities have shifted in recent years so that retired members outnumber younger ones. In 2018, 72% of the congregations providing data to the NRRO had a median age of 70 or older. With a higher median age comes a decline in income—due to the decreased number of wage-earning members—and a rising cost of care. The total cost of care for some 30,000 religious past age 70 now exceeds $1 billion annually.

“The sisters, brothers, and religious order priests who have dedicated their life to the Church through their ministry in our parishes, schools and health care organizations need care in their retirement,” said Presentation Sister Stephanie Still, executive director for the NRRO. “Each year, we Catholics across the nation unite prayerfully on the weekend of the Retirement Fund for Religious collection to honor the work done by sisters, brothers, and religious order priests. We are blessed by countless supporters who share our vision of ensuring that all religious can enjoy a safe and modest retirement.”

The 2018 appeal raised $27.7 million, and 360 religious congregations from around the country received financial assistance. Congregations may use the funding for immediate expenses, such as medications or nursing care. They are also able to invest it for the future retirement and eldercare needs of their respective religious communities. In addition, proceeds from the annual appeal enable the NRRO to furnish educational and consultative resources that help congregations to improve care and plan for long-term retirement needs.


Visit retiredreligious.org to learn more.

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Keywords: National Religious Retirement Office, NRRO, men and women religious, retirement, eldercare, U.S. bishops, Sister Stephanie Still, USCCB, U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, National Collection

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Media Contact:
Chieko Noguchi or Miguel Guilarte
202-541-3200